Wednesday, October 10, 2018

A 1938 Keystone with a garage.....

 This is a Keystone of Boston dollhouse produced in 1937-38. 
It is one of their enhanced models with wooden shutters 
on the second floor as opposed to the shutters that 
are painted on above the garage doors, and wooden 
pine trees on either side of the front door. 
I'm wondering if the blue roof originally matched 
the bright blue on the shutters and garage door.


It is filled with many brands of furniture, not all identifiable.


It is the home of Jim and Gloria Stewart 
and their daughters Julie and Kathy.


 Julie and Kathy play quietly in their room.....



and dad sits patiently in his chair while mom gets ready
 for their family portrait for a holiday greeting card.


And here it is!  Such a happy little family! 


The Stewart's lovely home has five rooms.....
 ...the living room, with stenciled/silk screened "wallpaper" in lavender, 

 the kitchen with "wallpaper" in green, 

 the parent's bedroom, 

 the bedroom of Julie and Kathy, 

and the bathroom located over the garage. 



The living room chairs, end tables and corner shelf are German made. The end tables and corner shelf are what is referred to as German Red-Stain and thought to have been produced by several German manufacturers during the 1920-30s. 

 The sofa may be from Schoenhut's 1930 production line, originally in a "Natural Wood Finish Not Varnished" or possibly from a line of furniture imported from Germany at the same time. More information on Schoenhut's complete line of dollhouse furniture can be found in 
by Patty Cooper, in soft cover or instant PDF download. 

 My chairs were originally a natural wood finish like the chair in the middle, but German manufacturers also sold the chair upholstered like the chair on the right. 

 The Schoenhut book indicates that both size sofas 
where available around 1930, with the smaller sofa 
being available in aqua or orange. 
My sofa, with a set of chairs, arrived painted black.


I am particularly fond of German Red-Stain pieces.
The lamp is Schoenhut from their initial production line of 1928. 
I was lucky to find a stock of vintage unpainted lamps on Ebay. 





I love the
shape of 
this
lamp!













      The kitchen.....unknown appliances, 
                         Lynnfield breakfast nook and table, 
                                          and Schoenhut cabinet in green.


Kitchen appliances, known among my 
dollhouse collector friends as "favorite kitchen".


This page from a Grandmother Stover's catalog
indicates that these kitchen appliances were
made in Chicago exclusively for Marshall Field. 


This Lynnfield breakfast nook, table and chairs, circa 1940,  
is not in the best of condition, but still a lovely set.



Sally Ann wrote her name under the table 
which is also stamped Made in U.S.A.

The china cabinet is found in the Schoenhut catalog of 1930 
and was part of the dining room set produced 
for their Apartment House Rooms. 



Both American and German furniture 
is found in the parent's bedroom. 


This furniture is not marked for manufacturer. However,  I have a larger dresser, in the same unusual pink color, with matching legs and exact mirror spindles, that is marked Germany. 
I have also seen this set in pale yellow and pale blue.


The chest is Schoenhut from their 1930 line. 
The chair is not marked, but resembles upholstered furniture made by Vinnie Doll House Furniture and Wee Dollhouse Furniture that was produced late 1930s thru 1940s. 
The carpet is one of those wonderful Japanese made 
furniture doilies so popular with dollhouse collectors.


 Julie and Kathy's room is decorated in pink, blue and ivory. 

 These sweet little beds, missing their unattached 
bedspreads, are marked Wee Dollhouse Furniture. 
The bedside table is Strombecker.


The hand painted dresser and chair are circa 1920s, either American or German, and have a matching bed that came with the set. The toy chest is Strombecker.




This wooden bath set was featured in the 1951 Chestnut Hill catalog and also in the 1961-62 Mark Farmer catalog with the kitchen furniture shown above. 
The hamper is part of the Strombecker line. 


This delightful scale was produced in 1935 by Strombecker.

6 comments:

  1. What a great collection of furniture and a neat old house. What a lucky family to live here! You did a great job on the post, the story, and the photos. Thank you for the inspiration and history. Troy

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    1. This will make you smile....my dad in this story was too tall to stand up on the lower floor! Cheers!

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  2. Love everything about this house and the way you have it delightfully set up!

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    Replies
    1. I have had this house for several years but have procrastinated about making new windows for it. I am very good at procrastinating. Cheers!

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  3. Oh wow, everything is in such wonderful condition.

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  4. One of my favorite Keystones and you have done it beautiflly,as always!
    Furniture is gorgeous!

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